Hamp and third wife Sarah(Sally)Robinson-Lowther-Crews

Hampton Micajah Crews

~Son of Micajah (1810 - 1877)and Emaliza Robinson Crews (1822 - 1896) ~

HAMPTON CREWS
Charlton County Paper notes:


October 4,1878 A massive epidemic of yellow fever sweeps through the South. In a small, unpretentious Pierce ( now Brantley) County farmhouse near Hoboken, Hampton Micajah Crews, Sr. 26, one of Pierce County's more prominent farmers, wore a relieved look as he sat in a massive rocking chair in the home's sitting room.In a bedroom adjoining the sitting room, his wife Basheba Guy Crews, 28 had just given birth to their son ,Hardy H. Crews.
The Hamp Crews family ultimately included four sons, Hardy, Hamp Jr. , Richard, Rob and a daughter, Mary, who married Stewart Conner.
Hamp Crews, a great great grandson of a Creek Indian Princess who earlier had moved to Pierce County from Wilmington, North Carolina, and his family moved again, this time from Pierce County to the Uptonville community of Charlton County in January,1899.
( I found other information saying that Mary E. who married James Robinson (Hamps g-g grandmother) was Tuscarora Indian Maiden)
In those days a person grew up quickly with scars of the nation's tragic civil war still fresh in their minds. Hamps son Hardy also grew up quickly. By the 1900 he had married the former Martha Thomas and the couple had two young children of their own, Nora and George.

Hamp was married three times:
Luisina Summerall was the first wife of Hampton J. Crews. She was a daughter of Pierce County Judge Summerall. I believe his first name was William. She died at 23 years of age and is buried in the Blackshear City Cemetery. 04 Jan 1850 - 25 Feb 1873. I seem to recall some notes somewhere saying she died along with the child in childbirth. The Brantley County Cemetery book shows two children that they list as Lusina's, a 3 year old and a 5 year old that for some reason died on the same day. They were both born after Lusina's death.

Basheba Guy Crews (1850 - 1918)
All Hamp's children that reached adulthood belonged to Basheba.

Sarah Jane "Sallie" Robinson Crews (1862 - 1940)



Charlton County Herald May 1932
Hampton Crews, born near Hoboken on September 12, 1852, died at his home near Uptonville Sunday evening. Last rites were held at the chapel at Sardis, Rev. W.O. Gibson, pastor officiating, Rev. Lester McDonald and Rev. I.T. Hickox assisting. Interment was at Sardis cemetery. Mr. Crews came to Charlton County in 1898 and located on the farm where he died. He made a splendid citizen and successful farmer and had always borne the reputation of being a straightforward and upstanding citizen. Surviving him are his widow, Mrs. Sallie Crews; three sons, H.H. Crews, H.M. Crews and R.C. Crews; one daughter, Mrs. L.S. Conner; two brothers Bryant Crews now 86 years old and Ban Crews. He had two sisters, Mrs. K.M. Anderson and Mrs. Emily Dowling. The material from which his coffin was made was selected by Mr. Crews some time back and the men he chose made it as he had directed. It was made from heart cypress grown near Winokur.


CHARLTON COUNTY HERALD January 12, 1940
MRS. SARAH JANE LOWTHER CREWS DIED. Many friends throughout the county were deeply grieved to learn of the death of Mrs. Sarah Jane Lowther Crews who passed away Saturday at the home of her only son, T.H. Lowther near Winokur, following an illness of pneumonia. Born May 5, 1862, Mrs. Crews was 77 years, 8 months and 1 day old at the time of her death. She was a member of a prominent pioneer Charlton County family and spent practically all her life in this county. Mrs. Crews was first married to the late O.K. Lowther. Several years following his death she married the late H.M. Crews, Sr., better known as Uncle Hamp. Surviving is an only child, T.H. Lowther, three grandchildren; three step-children, H.H. Crews, Mrs. Mary Conner and H.M. Crews, Jr. She was a faithful member of the Primitive Baptist Church for the past 48 years. Funeral services were held at Corinth Church and interment following in the Corinth cemetery.

Charlton County Herald March 1, 1929
O.H. LOWTHER DIED. O.H. Lowther, former native of Charlton County, died in Atlanta Saturday from self-inflicted wounds from a pistol shot according to a report in the Atlanta Journal. He was alone in his room at the time of the shot and was dead when entrance was effected. He was at one time a big property owner in Waycross and later had large turpentine interests in Florida. He passed through Folkston some ten days ago and stopped for a few hours' visit.

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